Unlike many regions in the country, the Seattle area is constantly reminded of its geologic past, present, and future. Whether it is our landslides, our glacier-carved topography, or our three major earthquake zones, this area’s geologic history is young, dynamic, and accessible. In this virtual talk, naturalist David B. Williams will provide an introduction to the city’s geology and how it affects the built environment.

This program is inspired by an exhibit, When Seattle Shakes, co-produced by AIA Seattle and the Seattle Architecture Foundation. Designed and curated by Mary Waelder, the exhibit explores how to align the goals of historic preservation and resilient design by understanding the most effective ways of protecting a city’s historic building stock against earthquakes.

Online exhibit: www.whenseattleshakes.com.

Photo Credit:

Brick image on left. Yesler Way, downtown Seattle, showing damage in 1949 earthquake from falling parapets and brick ornamentation and a collapsed fire escape. Photo by George Cankonen, Seattle Times.

Brick image on right. Pioneer Square, Seattle, showing damage after the 2001 Nisqually earthquake. Photo by David B. Williams.

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